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Friday, October 20, 2017

Jessie Ware: 'I didn't get maternity leave! I'm self-employed – being a musician is my business'

The London singer has had her first child – and with it a whole host of insecurities. She discusses anxiety, writing with Ed Sheeran and why she got hypnotherapy after a bad Guardian review

“Are you sure I don’t sound mad and unhinged?” Jessie Ware asks, again. We have spent two hours discussing hypnotherapy, impostor syndrome and her fears about failing as a mother as she tours her third album, Glasshouse, with her one-year-old in tow. No, I tell her. She sounds like a new mum who apologises too much because people like to make new mums feel they’re failing. Babies cry, that’s what they do – her daughter was meant to be asleep in their Berlin Airbnb all afternoon, but did a giant poo and woke up as we were about to start talking. “We’re buggered!” Ware laughs, before husband Sam Burrows takes the tot to the park.

Tonight, Ware will play a small club in Kreuzberg, debuting an ambitious, poppy revamp of her sophisticated soul sound. She wants to wear a sleeveless top but it’s being filmed for German TV: “Bingo wings, fuck that.” She’s nervous. Last night in Paris she had a massive cry, finally unleashing the pressure of spending nearly two years managing a career and new parenthood. “I felt like maybe this whole attempt at trying to be a superwoman was coming crashing down at the last hurdle,” she says.

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by Laura Snapes via Electronic music | The Guardian

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Lindstrøm: It’s Alright Between Us As It Is review – back on track with bubbling beats, jazz piano and goth feathers

(Smalltown Supersound)

Oslo producer Hans-Peter Lindstrøm, already known for being pretty cosmic, went further out than ever before with his last album, a collaboration with Todd Rundgren that turned them both to spaghetti in a psychedelic black hole. He’s now back out the other side, making his traditional “space disco”, but with some beautiful acid-flashback flourishes. Spire and Tensions evoke cocktail hour at an Ibizan villa, before But Isn’t It and Shinin nicely showcase house and Italo songcraft. All pleasant enough, but Lindstrøm then levels up in the final third, with Drift, a hail of petals that recalls Orbital’s Belfast, and the jazz piano that poignantly destabilises closing tracks Bungl (Like a Ghost) and Under Trees. The former is also invigorated by stark poetry and black-feathery cooing from Jenny Hval, a gothic phantom haunting the club with a gravestone on her back.

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by Ben Beaumont-Thomas via Electronic music | The Guardian

Jessie Ware: Glasshouse review – smooth soul, ramped up when the diva lets loose

(PMR/Island)

Emerging at the tail end of the dubstep movement, south London’s Jessie Ware has long been the musical equivalent of a minimalist Scandi clothes store, all restrained vocals thoughtfully draped over barely there electronica. On Glasshouse, she manages to harness her rarely seen diva mode in among the pared-back hallmarks, but the result is a mixed one. Opener – and lead single – Midnight sees her push her vocals in all directions for striking falsetto-propelled soul, while Selfish Love capitalises on the current Latin pop trend in pleasingly classy fashion with no clunky attempts at Spanish. Elsewhere, Sam – co-written with Ed Sheeran – is a four-chord story of finding The One and having her now one-year-old daughter, lifted by Ware’s raw family confessional. Unfortunately, though, there’s plenty of “pleasant-but-insipid” here, such as Slow Me Down and Stay Awake, Wait for Me – both drowned in radio-friendly sultriness – and Your Domino, which feels like a paunchy, overproduced take on 2012 single If You’re Never Gonna Move. Ware is arguably at her best here when she drops the hyper-stylised veneer and gives the pop star lark her best shot, rather than openly hedging those bets.

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by Hannah J Davies via Electronic music | The Guardian

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Flying Lotus apologises after defending the Gaslamp Killer over rape allegations

The Grammy-nominated producer, who told an audience ‘the internet is a liar’, admitted his comments were insensitive

Grammy-nominated electronic music producer Flying Lotus has apologised after he made comments supporting fellow producer the Gaslamp Killer, who has been accused of rape.

The Gaslamp Killer has been accused of drugging and raping a woman and her friend in 2013 – one posted an account of the alleged attack on Twitter. He has since issued a statement denying the allegations, saying: “I would never hurt or endanger a woman. I would never drug a woman, and I would never put anyone in a situation where they were not in control, or take anything that they weren’t offering.”

Related: #MeToo named the victims. Now, let's list the perpetrators | Jessica Valenti

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by Ben Beaumont-Thomas via Electronic music | The Guardian

Monday, October 16, 2017

No Bounds festival review – pristine rhythms, punky noise and visceral electronic thrills

Various venues, Sheffield
Terre Thaemlitz’s polemic kicked off an extraordinary festival celebrating everything electronic, from Jeff Mills’ minimalism to Giant Swan’s improv rave

Rare is the music festival that kicks off with an audiovisual polemic against reproduction pieced together from blurry clips of Japanese pornography – but then not every music festival is bold enough to book Terre Thaemlitz as its opening act. The Kawasaki-based DJ is always good for an unorthodox viewpoint, and by the end of this thrillingly provocative presentation a room full of twentysomething ravers find themselves unexpectedly committed to the destruction of the nuclear family.

Thaemlitz’s disturbing, thought-provoking show adds a brief political frisson to a festival that’s otherwise all about the sheer thrill of electronic sound. Sheffield’s legacy as a crucible of electronic innovation seems to hold little sway over this first edition of No Bounds, which draws its lineup from around the world – though local computer-music elder Mark Fell is given a hero’s welcome, a testament to this crowd’s appetite for challenging rhythms.

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by Chal Ravens via Electronic music | The Guardian

No alternative: how brands bought out underground music

Timberland hosts rap gigs. Princess Nokia makes films for Maybelline. And Red Bull is the new school of rock. Have brand partnerships destroyed counterculture? Or are they all that’s keeping it alive?

Timberland hosts rap gigs. Princess Nokia makes films for Maybelline. And Red Bull is the new school of rock. Have brand partnerships destroyed counterculture? Or are they all that’s keeping it alive?

Kiran Gandhi (@madamegandhi stage name: Madame Gandhi) is an activist and electronic music artist. The former drummer for M.I.A. and the iconic free-bleeding runner at the 2015 London Marathon, she now writes music that celebrates the female voice. The womens #SUPERSTAR Slip-On is available now.

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by Rachel Aroesti via Electronic music | The Guardian

Sunday, October 15, 2017

Organ Reframed review – kitsch, rapture and white-knuckle intensity

Union Chapel, London
Indie rockers joined doyens of the electronic avant garde for a festival of new music exploring the otherworldly sounds of the pipe organ

In the last few years it has become fashionable for electronic musicians to renounce their computers in favour of the pre-digital delights of 60s- and 70s-style modular synths. Evidently, the next logical step is the reappraisal of the pipe organ – for what is a pipe organ but the original synthesiser, its array of keyboards, knobs and levers designed to produce an awe-inspiring barrage of otherworldly sound? This is the thinking behind Organ Reframed, a festival of new works for pipe organ by doyens of the electronic avant garde (plus the odd intrepid indie rock band), now in its second year at Union Chapel, London.

Along with the flamboyant recitals of Cameron Carpenter and its appearance on acclaimed experimental releases by, among others, Kara-Lis Coverdale and Tim Hecker, it seems that the organ might be having a bit of a moment.

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by Sam Richards via Electronic music | The Guardian

Friday, October 13, 2017

Dom Servini at The Jazz Cafe on 10/11

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Dom Servini at The Jazz Cafe on 10/11

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Dom Servini at The Jazz Cafe on 24/11

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Dom Servini at The Jazz Cafe on 17/11

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Thursday, October 12, 2017

Dom Servini at The Jazz Café on 03/11

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Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Dom Servini at The Church Inn on 28/10

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Dom Servini at The Independent Label Market on 25/11

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Dom Servini at POP Brixton on 17/11/17

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Monday, October 9, 2017

Grime trailblazer Major Ace dies

Rapper and founding member of the influential UK garage group Pay As U Go Cartel had suffered from a brain tumour for three years

Grime pioneer Major Ace has died, his family reports. The rapper, whose real name was Luke Monero, had been suffering from a brain tumour for almost three years.

Major Ace was part of the UK garage crew Pay As U Go Cartel, which was instrumental in shaping the grime sound. His brother Cass confirmed Monero’s death via Instagram on 9 October.

Broken

Thank you for the memories bro sleep deep. #RIPMAJORACE

Related: A history of grime, by the people who created it

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by Guardian music via Electronic music | The Guardian

Sunday, October 8, 2017

Gary Numan: how the Billboard charts told him his tracks aren't electric

Despite 95% of the instrumentation on Numan’s new album being electronic, the US chart company says it does not qualify for their dance/electronic countdown

Gary Numan is one of the most famous creators of electronic music. Since 1979, when his band Tubeway Army’s single Are ‘Friends’ Electric?a song about a robot sex worker – spent four weeks at No 1, he has been routinely described as an “electronic pioneer” and a Google search for “Numan electronic” produces 526,000 results.

However, this doesn’t satisfy US chart company Billboard, who have decreed that his new album, Savage (Songs From A Broken World), does not qualify for their dance/electronic chart, even though 95% of it was produced by electronic instruments. According to producer Ade Fenton, Savage’s 51 channels of synthesisers and electronic drums make it the “most electronic” of the four albums he and Numan have worked on. However, the album’s classification as rock/alternative means that Numan has missed out on an almost certain dance/electronic No1, instead having to settle for a rather more lowly rock/alternative No 22.

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by Dave Simpson via Electronic music | The Guardian

Moses Sumney: ‘I have an obsession with loneliness, singledom, isolation’

It’s impossible not to love the genre-spurning singer with a heavenly falsetto – despite his ‘obnoxious obsession’

Of the many striking aspects of Moses Sumney – his skyscraping height, his hallucinatory, Nina Simone-like dreamscapes, his Rolodex of starry musician friends – most intriguing of all is his voice. A feathery falsetto, often layered to celestial effect, it flutters daintily over lambent guitar and sweeping strings. It’s surely the reason that Sufjan Stevens and James Blake asked him to join them on tour. Or why Beck chose Sumney to appear on his covers compilation, Song Reader; ditto Solange Knowles, for last year’s epic A Seat at the Table. As he explains one evening in a restaurant in Echo Park, Los Angeles, sometimes singing to him “feels like dancing”.

There is plenty of vocal pirouetting on his debut, Aromanticism, an album that shades in the grey between folk, soul and something else – something otherworldly – entirely. So it’s surprising to hear that his soft style stems from being so shy in his school days that he would “sing under my breath a lot”. At 10, his pastor parents moved from California, where he was born, to Accra in Ghana, where his fellow students would mock his American accent. It kickstarted what he calls “an almost obnoxious obsession with loneliness, singledom, isolation…”, which has permeated his music ever since.

Related: Moses Sumney: Aromanticism review – a single-minded star

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by Kate Hutchinson via Electronic music | The Guardian

High Contrast: Night Gallery review – muscular rhythms, winning melodies

(3 Beat/Universal)

Lincoln Barrett pushes himself further out of his drum’n’bass comfort zone on this sixth High Contrast album, with varying results. Disconcerting glam call-to-arms Shotgun Mouthwash (which puts forward the uncontroversial proposition that the former is “a good substitute” for the latter) doesn’t quite succeed, but on the marvellous, audacious Tobacco Road he effectively invents drum’n’blues. Barrett’s latest shot for the charts, The Beat Don’t Feel the Same, is tepid Chic-ish house, yet the previous single, Questions, is a glorious success. The best songs are smart, bassy takes on EDM, blending muscular rhythms and winning melodies reminiscent of Barrett’s anthemic Adele remixes.

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by Damien Morris via Electronic music | The Guardian

Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith: The Kid review – a charming electronic exploration of life

(Western Vinyl)

Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith’s last album, 2016’s EARS, was a suite essentially about wonderment. The one before, Euclid (2015), took its inspiration from geometry. Dry summaries like those don’t really do justice to the swirls and whorls of the LA-based musician’s electro-acoustic work. Here, Smith tracks the life of a person from twinkle in the eye to autonomous being contemplating life’s end; the journey’s emotional arc is conceived as four sides of a double album. To say that the title track sounds like she has trapped some analogue synths and a choir in a washing machine means no disrespect. This album is crammed with tweeting electronics, hydraulic rhythms, sleights of hand and Smith’s own backseat vocals; she hints at non-western forms and systems music, but never so you are not charmed.

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by Kitty Empire via Electronic music | The Guardian

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith: The Kid review – analogue psychedelia with some growing up to do

(Western Vinyl)

With modular synths growing densely around her multitracked voice, this album from Pacific-coastal artist Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith becomes as lush, heady – and occasionally trying – as a rainforest. It’s an ambitious record in four parts, with each quarter representing a different emotional phase of a human lifespan.

Her melodies share the courtly poise of English folksong and the psychedelic naivety of Animal Collective – they accurately evoke the blitheness of youth in the album’s first half, but also, less fortunately, its directionlessness. The textural pleasures of tracks such as I Am Learning and A Kid – full of wonky tiki kitsch – are muted by the vocal lines which, given starker backing, would be embarrassingly underwritten. Things improve in the later, more reflective tracks, as the rhythms and melodies simplify and stretch out, particularly on the beautiful closing track To Feel Your Best, underpinned by a faint, watery dancehall beat.

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by Ben Beaumont-Thomas via Electronic music | The Guardian

Kelela: Take Me Apart review – future-facing glitchy R&B with traction

(Warp)

When Washington-born singer Kelela released her first mixtape, Cut 4 Me, in 2013, her fusion of sumptuous R&B vocals and harsh, avant garde electronica made a splash. But in the four years since, alternative R&B has gone from bleeding edge to genre du jour: in a class now crowded with thoroughly modern divas, has anyone has been saving Kelela a seat? As her debut album opens, the idea that the singer may have been left behind by the sound she helped establish doesn’t seem outlandish: Frontline is funky but plodding and retro in its staccato style. Thankfully, Take Me Apart soon proffers tracks that are both pop-minded and gratifyingly future-facing. Producer Arca may be her not-so-secret weapon in the latter regard, creating sublime but techy sonic hellscapes among the ambient synths and skittering beats.

Meanwhile, Kelela’s vocal stops Take Me Apart ending up as a fragmented series of sounds: consistently exquisite as it dances between lovesick confusion and shrewd sensuality.

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by Rachel Aroesti via Electronic music | The Guardian

Readers recommend playlist: your songs about spinning

A reader takes a dizzying look through your suggestions, with Kylie Minogue, Dead Or Alive, Kate Tempest and Arctic Monkeys all making the list

Here is this week’s playlist – songs picked by a reader from hundreds of suggestions on last week’s callout. Thanks for taking part. Read more about how our weekly series works at the end of the piece.

Admit it. You’ve had that slightly sicky feeling when a special person comes close. You know the one – the nausea, the worry your legs might buckle, the head-rush, the dizziness. That. Our opening two pure pop tracks – Dead Or Alive’s You Spin Me Round (Like a Record) and Vic Reeves and the Wonder Stuff with Dizzy – capture all this and get us under way in a whirlwind of love and confusion.

I go round in circles
Not graceful, not like dancers
Not neatly, not like compass and pencil
More like a dog on a lead, going mental

Throwing Muses - Dizzy

The vaspod has Dizzies by Vic Reeves, Siouxsie & The Banshees, and TM. This is the best. Kristin Hersh's conscious attempt to write a hit single. And had there been any justice in this world she would have done. Gorgeous and bitter melancholy about the last Native American in Oklahoma. (I've just been there, there are actually loads.)

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by Sarah Chappell via Electronic music | The Guardian

Monday, October 2, 2017

The month's best music: Post Malone, Björk, Lorenzo Senni and more

From Charlotte Gainsbourg’s delicate minimalism to kick-ass indie-punk by Dream Wife – plus Somali disco and elegant techno – here are 50 of the month’s best tracks

Last month we launched the first of an ongoing series at the Guardian where we round up 50 of the month’s best tracks, across all genres – and tell you a bit more about 10 of the most exciting ones below. You can subscribe to the playlists via various streaming services in this widget, and let us know what you think in the comments. Google Play Music users can access the playlist here.

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by Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Rachel Aroesti via Electronic music | The Guardian

Sunday, October 1, 2017

Four Tet: New Energy review – hardly true to the title

(Text)

There are those for whom Kieran Hebden’s drift towards the dancefloor is something to lament, and those for whom it was an unexpected flash of excitement in the subtle folktronica master’s largely super-chilled career. But even for the latter camp, there is a growing suspicion that he’s now best experienced live; this ninth album has the expansive, wandering pleasantness of a self-release unbothered by PR hurly-burly. What it doesn’t have is a great deal of tracks to pull you back, bar perhaps the insistent pulse and fluttering vocal samples of Scientists. The unremarkably housey SW9 9SL tries to up the stakes, but dreamy as the somnolent groove and sitar twinkle of Two Thousand and Seventeen and the nervily upbeat steel pan sounds of Lush are, there’s nothing with the jolting surprise of Kool FM from 2013’s jungle-flavoured Beautiful Rewind, and the album title feels, ultimately, misleading.

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by Emily Mackay via Electronic music | The Guardian

Andrew Weatherall: Qualia review – sumptuous take on dancefloor solitude

(Höga Nord)

Qualia” is a lovely word for the private sensations of experience. Or the private experience of sensations. Either way, it’s an excellent take on the communal solitude of the dancefloor, all of us alone together. Appropriately, where Weatherall’s last album Convenanza was largely expansive and vocal-led, Qualia is more insular and instrumental. Over the last few years, the DJ-producer has been proselytising for slower, lower dance music, but this set goes for a mid-paced, light feel with live-sounding drums, no brass and little bass. Apart from Vorfreude 2’s militant chug, it’s unexceptional. Sumptuous listening, immaculately constructed, but lacking the malevolent heft of his classics.

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by Damien Morris via Electronic music | The Guardian

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Dom Servini at The Jazz Café on 27/10

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Sunday, September 24, 2017

Tricky: Ununiform review – stark and slinky

(False Idols/!K7)

Strange things are afoot on Tricky’s 13th LP: its quality, for one. The trip-hop maverick’s former foil, Martina Topley-Bird, guests for the first time in 14 years; a sombre treat. Elsewhere, Russian rappers jostle against a perplexing cover version of Hole’s Doll Parts. The former are excellent, with the lairy Scriptonite juxtaposed against Tricky’s malevolent drawl on Same As It Ever Was (a Talking Heads reference, surely). The latter? If only Tricky had sung it, rather than one of his myriad guests. Throughout, Tricky creates a claustrophobic world full of stark bass lines, pop digressions and slinky Bristol moments; his duet with Francesca Belmonte, New Stole, is particularly moreish.

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by Kitty Empire via Electronic music | The Guardian

Friday, September 22, 2017

Dom Servini – Unherd Radio Show #7 on Soho Radio

Listen again here!

 

Hermeto Pascoal – Dança Do Paje (Far Out)
Phil France – Joy of Brass (Mr. Scruff Remix) (Gondwana)
Son of Sam – Put It On Ya feat. Soundsci & Mr Thing (Bandcamp)
Compilation of the Month: Crown Ruler Sound
Kosmik 3 – I’m Gonna Pack (Jeremy Spellacey Edit) (Spacetalk)
Leonidas & Hobbes – Web of Intrigue (Original Mix) (Hobbes Music)
Makadem – Nyako (Jinku Remix) (On The Corner)
Jordan Rakei – Goodbyes (Ninja Tune)
Werkha – Foolin’ Self feat. Berry Blacc (Tru Thoughts)
L’Orange – Look Around (feat. Oddisee) (Mello Music Group)
Space Captain – Sycamore (Tru Thoughts)
Antonio Adolfo – Cascavel (Artezanal)
The Showfa – See Thru Bon Bon (Original Mix)(Midnight Riot)
Compilation of the Month: Crown Ruler Sound
Legacy – Monday Blues (Spacetalk)
Charlie Smooth – Mesta Lanion (Smooth Operators)
COEO – Flesh World (Kapote’s Drum Jam Version) (Toytonics)
Washed Out – Get Lost (J Rocc Edit) (Stones Throw)
Soothsayers – Blinded Souls (Simbad ’79 Raw Disco Mix) (Wah Wah 45s)
Thrilogy – The Hustle (Fate & Fiction)
Donnie & Joe Emerson – Baby (Perlair Remix) (Unreleased)
Compilation of the Month: Crown Ruler Sound
Ezy & Isaac – Let Your Body Move (Oba Balu Balu) (Spacetalk)
Funkadelic – Music 4 Your Mother (Moodyman Edit) (White)
EERA – Christine (Big Dada)
Portico Quartet – Lines Glow (Gondwana)
The Last Welfare Record – PBD (Planet Sundae)
Tony Allen – Bad Roads (Blue Note)
Sun Ra & his Arkestra – Along Came Ra (Art Yard)

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Thursday, September 21, 2017

The Horrors: V review – spindly indie survivors hit their sweet spot

Against the odds, the Horrors’ fifth album is their best yet, with Faris Badwan’s commanding, world-weary vocals adding to the synthesised thrills and sparkling guitar-pop

Let us briefly take a detour down memory lane. It is 2007 and, as a contestant on the most recent series of Big Brother has so eloquently put it, “there’s a new music that’s taking over our country and it’s called … ‘indie’”. The Pigeon Detectives bestride the Top 20. The second Razorlight album has just been certified five times platinum. The pages of the Observer play host to a feature that wonders aloud how Bloc Party will cope with being propelled to superstardom as a result of their new album: “A zeitgeist-defining record that rips up the rock rulebook.”

Strange days indeed, but imagine the consternation you could cause were you able to offer everyone a glimpse into the future, a world 10 years hence where Razorlight are headlining not Reading and Leeds but a VW campervan convention in Llangollen; where the lead singer of the Kaiser Chiefs is now best-known as a judge on a talent show, and where the frontman of the Arctic Monkeys has left Yorkshire, changed his accent and now favours the world not with gritty vignettes of provincial Britain, but updates from the frontline of life as a swashbuckling multi-millionaire cocksman, rampant amid the sun-bronzed lovelies of Hollywood.

Related: The Horrors review – eldritch rockers signal move into the big leagues

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by Alexis Petridis via Electronic music | The Guardian

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Soft Cell – 10 of the best

In the last of this series, we look back at Soft Cell’s bleak but beautiful synthpop – from their run of Top 3 hits to their disintegration amid drug use and nervous breakdown

Likeminded art student renegades at Leeds Polytechnic in the late 70s, Dave Ball and Marc Almond originally came together to make music to accompany theatrical productions – an evolution of Almond’s developing interest in often extreme, sexual, graphic and confrontational performance art. Their first release, the short EP Mutant Moments, was funded by a £2,000 loan from Ball’s mum, and was enough to grab the attention of record label Some Bizzare, whose eccentric owner, Stevo, would go on to talent-spot some of the 80s’ best underground electronic groups. Their early single Memorabilia, from 1981, reveals just how much of the winning Soft Cell formula was already firmly in place. Claustrophobic, slightly stalker-y (“I have got to have you”) and with a brilliant electronic riff that lodged in your brain alongside the pen portrait of an obsessive collector, it was a remarkable calling card.

Related: Marc Almond: ‘I’ve had the chance to be subversive in the mainstream’

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by Jude Clarke via Electronic music | The Guardian

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Letter: Pierre Henry obituary

I followed the work of Pierre Henry from his earliest compositions, including his many collaborations with my friend the choreographer Maurice Béjart. When I was appointed as artistic director and choreographer for the opening celebrations of the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King in Liverpool, I was able to commission Pierre to create the world’s first electronic mass, a task he was eager to undertake.

The intention was to create a performance with two masses – the 17th-century orchestral Messa Concertata by Francesco Cavalli, followed by Pierrey’s electronic Messe de Liverpool (Liverpool Mass) – and with both works simultaneously performed by dancers. In the event Pierre’s mass was not fully realised in time for the opening celebrations starting on 26 May 1967, although an extract from the partially completed mass was heard, and a choreography created to his Musique pour les Evangiles. The completed work was issued as an LP some time later and was first heard in France.

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by Bill Harpe via Electronic music | The Guardian

LCD Soundsystem review – euphoric dancefloor pop reignited

The Warehouse Project, Manchester
Six years after a farewell tour, frontman James Murphy gets back under the glitterball to revive his special brand of thunderous, emotional dance music

At midnight in Manchester, blue neon bathes the bricks of a former air-raid shelter under Piccadilly station. The floor is sardined with young clubbers and ageing, ecstatic ravers, all heralding a band currently at No 1 in the US.

Related: LCD Soundsystem: American Dream review – virtuosic comeback full of harmonies and humblebrags | Album of the week

Related: LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy: ‘I was a joke. My wife said I was going to die’

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by Jude Rogers via Electronic music | The Guardian

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Gary Numan: Savage (Songs from a Broken World) review – pop gleams amid the dystopian gloom

(BMG)

Once a fading 1970s synthpop star, Gary Numan’s career has been gradually revitalised since Sugababes’ 2002 smash Freak Like Me mashed up his Are “Friends” Electric? and Nine Inch Nails and Marilyn Manson hailed him as a pioneer of electronic industrial gloom. There’s plenty of the latter on his 21st studio album. Guitars and keyboards crash like falling slabs of granite, percussion pulses throb and synths purr ominously. Numan’s dystopian worldview hasn’t been exactly cheered by climate change or leaving Britain for Los Angeles, only to find a Trumpocalypse. “We live in a windswept hell, not even God remembers”, he sings, bleakly. However, tunefulness permeates the intensity like rays of sunshine. Huge, Cars-type banks of synthesisers fire Bed of Thorns and The End of Things and the east Asian-tinged My Name Is Ruin (featuring 11-year-old daughter Persia) is one of his catchiest songs in years. For all the retooling, the vintage Numanoid still has a pop star’s beating heart.

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by Dave Simpson via Electronic music | The Guardian

Paper Tiger live at Gwdihŵ Café Bar (Cardiff) on 14/10

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Paper Tiger live at The Jam Jar (Bristol) on 13/10

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Hunrosa at The Deaf Institute (Manchester) on 29/11

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Hunrosa + Paper Tiger live at The Eagle Inn (Salford) on 19/11

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Monday, September 11, 2017

'We were just clowning about': how cartoon rave changed pop

Twenty-five years ago, the British charts exploded with cheap and cheerful songs such as Sesame’s Treet, Trip to Trumpton and Ebeneezer Goode, that turned a whole generation on to dance music

Underage discos could be pretty strange in the early 1990s. You’d get a blast of Nirvana; maybe even REM for the more sophisticated pre-teen. But you were also guaranteed to hear at least one example of speaker-rattling, drug-referencing rave music that borrowed samples of children’s TV tunes for its hooks – samples that its pre-teen audience was too young to have nostalgia for.

Related: Machines of loving grace: how Artificial Intelligence helped techno grow up

It was pretty bizarre. I had to do Top of the Pops, then carry on working as a chef

There was a time when I'd get annoyed that people would ​be ​go​ing​ on about this tune like it was a joke

Related: Cult heroes: Altern-8, the pop jesters who took rave music to the playground

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by Ben Cardew via Electronic music | The Guardian

Sunday, September 10, 2017

Dom Servini – Unherd Soul #1 on MiSoul Connoisseurs

Listen here!

1st Hour

Intro

Jordan Rakei – Nerve

Flamingosis – Want Me (Need Me)

Madison Washington – Royalty

Pry – This Cycle feat. Omar Soulay

Honeyfeet – Sinner (Envee Remix) *Exclusive

Space Captain – Loveline (The Drive Home)

Washed Out – Hard to Say Goodbye (Lone Remix)

Escapism Refuge – Unlock

Werkha – So London

30/70 – Misrepresented

Island Jazz Quartet – Feel Like Makin’ Love

Tony Allen – Woro Dance

Featured Compilation: Beating Heart South Africa Vol. 3

Throwing Shade – Wonderful Sushi

Kutiman – Too Late feat. Princess Shaw

Johnny Moore – Big Big Boss

2nd Hour

Intro

Lou Bond – To the Establishment

Sunny & the Sunliners – Our Day Will Come

Lee Fields – Precious Love

Gaby Hernandez – Stay a While

Courtney Pine – Butterfly feat. Omar
Shanta Nurullah’s Sitarsys – A Message, A Vision

Featured Compilation: Beating Heart South Africa Vol. 3
Thor Rixon – Tula Mutwana

The Soul Session – Quantraversa feat. Georgia Anne Muldrow

Kushti – Taking Hold feat. Alice Russell
Julia Beil – Wasting Breath
Yazmin Lacey – Black Moon
Resonators – Right Time (Ash Walker Remix)
Tropical Energy – La Destinee
Sibusile Xaba – Open Letter to Adoniah
Featured Compilation: Beating Heart South Africa Vol. 3
Hunrosa – Mohodo

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Mount Kimbie: Love What Survives review – a change of pace

(Warp)

Since their acclaimed 2010 debut Crooks & Lovers, production duo Dominic Maker and Kai Campos, AKA Mount Kimbie, have gradually shaken off their “post-dubstep” label with tunes better suited to sticky-floored indie dives than pensive, 6am bus journeys. On this third album they’ve all but replaced their former glossy, fragmented electronica with live instrumentation, krautrock drums and vocals from James Blake, King Krule, Micachu and Andrea Balency. As tracks quickly pivot between ragged indie rock, melodic dance music and wistful, tinkly tunes, the record feels disjointed, but a few productions stand out as some of their most inventive yet, particularly the intricate weave of synth and organic sounds on James Blake collaborations We Go Home Together and How We Got By.

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by Isa Jaward via Electronic music | The Guardian

Zola Jesus: Okovi review – a perfect hybrid

(Sacred Bones)

Returning to long-term label Sacred Bones after a sojourn at Mute for 2014’s relatively poppy Taiga, Nika Roza Danilova has perfected her hybrid of industrial electronics and gothic power balladry on her fifth album. Bearing aloft a forensic inquiry into mortality and loss on the wings of her formidable voice, she soars from the shuddering strings and chilly wails of Exhumed to the trip-hop grandeur of Soak and the sweeping romanticism of Witness, via Siphon’s warm assurance of unflinching support to a friend on the edge (“We’d rather clean the blood of a living man”). An album to light the way through the darkest hours.

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by Emily Mackay via Electronic music | The Guardian

Lunice: CCCLX CD review – doesn’t quite add up

(Lucky Me)

In the five years since electronic duo TNGHT – Hudson Mohawke and Canadian producer Lunice – released their self-titled EP before announcing an indefinite hiatus, Mohawke has worked with artists such as Kanye West; Lunice has taken a more low-key route. Unfortunately, his debut solo album is largely underwhelming, especially for what’s described as a “theatrical showcase”. It’s industrial, but somehow not abrasive enough; ominous, but in an almost cheesy rather than menacing way. There are striking moments – Drop Down bubbles with rapper Le1f’s playful flow and Sophie’s additional production, while Distrust seethes spaciously. The elements are there but never really draw you in. Overall, CCCLX doesn’t quite add up.

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by Tara Joshi via Electronic music | The Guardian

Friday, September 8, 2017

Hunrosa at Omeara (London) on 02/10

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Hunrosa at The Canteen (London) on 29/09

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Hunrosa at Jazz refreshed (London) on 28/09

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'The hippie dream is still alive': how Ibiza went from techno to boho

Railing against VIP areas and generic EDM are a crop of promoters tapping into the original spirit of Ibiza: bohemianism, Balearic beat and cosmic alignment

It’s Friday afternoon in Ibiza, the sun is beating down and I’ve arrived at an old army barracks in the centre of the Spanish clubbing mecca for the inaugural Aniwa Gathering. It resembles a rave; the police, naturally, have already tried to close it down. But despite the troupes of hippies, decorative canopies and the totem pole demarcating the entrance, it is most definitely not a rave.

While the tech house superclubs prepare for another night of narcotics and vest-clad fist pumping, this is an event singing to a different tune. If you’ve ever wondered what happens when a former Brazilian model and a ex-director of a tech startup discover ayahuasca, then you’ve found your answer: they launch a foundation dedicated to the promotion of indigenous culture, start a festival and fly in 40 spiritual leaders from around the world to lead a series of talks, performances and ceremonies including the ritualistic sharing of cacao, the consumption of “plant medicine” and sweat lodges. Whatever your poison, Ibiza is always going to be an island of excess.

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by Will Coldwell via Electronic music | The Guardian

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Mount Kimbie: Love What Survives review – electric wit and wisdom from London synth duo

(Warp Records)

In recent years, London duo Mount Kimbie have shrugged off their post-dubstep past and started to create songs that shepherd synth-heavy post-punk into the present day. On their third album, the band’s instrumentals radiate wit and warmth, like mid-80s New Order sloshing around in a sun-kissed sea – but it’s as a foil to some of Britain’s most idiosyncratic artists that Mount Kimbie really prove their mettle. Marilyn, their collaboration with Micachu, produces a masterly melange of outside-the-box melodies, James Blake’s hyper-emotional pipes meet creepily corrupted gospel on We Go Home Together, while the brilliant You Look Certain (I’m Not So Sure)’s chit-chatty vocals (courtesy of Andrea Balency, the band’s touring singer) recall post-punkers such as Vivien Goldman and the Raincoats. The record’s other highlight, Blue Train Lines, sees the duo reprise their hugely fruitful alliance with King Krule, artfully tempering the latter’s cracked howl with neat motorik drums and restrained synths that hover politely on the fringes of white noise.

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by Rachel Aroesti via Electronic music | The Guardian

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

DJ Dom Servini at Bussey Building (Peckham) on 21/10

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DJ Dom Servini at The Jazz Café (Night Thing) on 20/10

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DJ Dom Servini at Badaboum (Paris) on 19/10

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DJ Dom Servini at House of Tippler (London) on 14/10

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DJ Dom Servini at The Jazz Café on 13/10

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