da873623c98928185f5fee6ee4eb4d49

The Underground Is Massive: How Electronic Dance Music Conquered America by Michaelangelo Matos – review | Musique Non Stop

da873623c98928185f5fee6ee4eb4d49

Thursday, December 31, 2015

The Underground Is Massive: How Electronic Dance Music Conquered America by Michaelangelo Matos – review

Why, after three decades, is rave culture suddenly big business in America? A history of the scene links its rise to the internet

Three decades after its inception in preponderantly black and gay club scenes, dance music has finally seized commercial hegemony over the white, middle-American audiences that had previously ignored it. In the process, however, the nomenclature has been disfigured. I can’t think of any three-letter abbreviation that discomfits me as viscerally as EDM (electronic dance music), nor one that forces me into such stark confrontation with the depths of my own elitism.

In the introduction to The Underground Is Massive, the music journalist Michaelangelo Matos’s chronicle of the genre’s strange journey from chthonian reverie to ubiquitous clamour, the dread letters are unfurled in their redundant ungainliness. Like three shuffling dads shanghaied into a four-legged race at a school sports day, EDM as a term is desperately behind the curve and painfully parochial. Thinking of those for whom house, techno and their evolutionary offshoots have long been the only game in town, I’m reminded of a brilliant scene in Girls, where Jemima Kirke’s Jessa hurls a bottle at two “crusty sacks of shit”, one of whom responds: “You’re going to reduce us to a subculture and then not accurately name the subculture? Nice.”

He bites his tongue regarding the current generation of superstar DJs

Continue reading...
by Alexis Forss via Electronic music | The Guardian
jQuery(document).ready() {