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New Order: ‘There’s no point in just staying together for the kids’ | Musique Non Stop

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Sunday, September 27, 2015

New Order: ‘There’s no point in just staying together for the kids’

Eight years on from their acrimonious split with Peter Hook, New Order are back with a stonking new album, a new lineup and a newfound joy in the electronic sound of their seminal 1989 album Technique

I meet New Order in Manchester Central Library, which has had a makeover. It was always a beautiful building, but the entrance has been redesigned and the whole place has a new feel: modern, airy, welcoming.

It would be easy to use the library as a metaphor for New Order – a Mancunian institution, born out of the city’s industrial past, refreshed and equipped for the future with contemporary add-ons – but, you know, let’s not. Instead, let’s say that in 2015, New Order is the same, but different. Though the lineup has changed over the years, the band is consistent, still about the same thing: revolutionary music made by anti-musicians who use machines to produce emotion, who mix electronic sounds with guitars, who represent the racket and attitude of the city that binds them together. That’s what New Order is. Although most of their fans – and I am one – would say that music is only part of it. We could also mention the aesthetics, the tragedy, the bloody-mindedness, the out-of-your-mindedness; the ability to unite hooligans and hedonists, swots and drop-outs; to give something to clubbers and those who can’t get out of their bedroom. There is all that, too.

Related: Watch New Order's new video for song Restless

It was like a football team with two strikers and one of them won't pass the ball, but keeps missing the goal

As a band we don't talk about things. We never have. It's a northern male thing… the basis for a dysfunctional family

I think the others could have avoided some of the problems they've had, if they'd had a break too

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by Miranda Sawyer via Electronic music | The Guardian
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